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  • Ground-sniffing robot may give tracker dogs a run for their money

    1h By Ben Coxworth
    Could scent-tracking sniffer dogs be out of a job? Well, perhaps eventually. Scientists from Japan's Kyushu University have developed a prototype robot that can detect and follow odors left on the ground, such as those deposited in footprints...…
  • Magik Book catalog syncs with digital content on a tablet

    4h By Paul Ridden
    Thumbing through a product catalog can be a little flat, and very low tech. Augmented reality can bring a book to life by pointing a smartphone or tablet camera at coded objects on a page and viewing the results on the smart device's screen. Portugal-based…
  • Lunar Lander micro-house is out of this world

    10:33am By Adam Williams
    Kurt Hughes originally trained as an architect but spent the last 35 years designing yachts. This experience creating comfortable living quarters in relatively small and awkward spaces clearly served him well for his passion project: a unique off-grid…
  • AM1 e-bike keeps it minimalist and lightweight

    8:10am By Paul Ridden
    Bicycles packing an electric motor to help flatten out hills or get riders to work without breaking a sweat can stray quite a bit from the classic form of a traditional two wheeler. There are notable exceptions of course, and if it wasn't for its line-spoiling…
  • X-rays from deep space help track down the universe's missing matter

    3:02am By Michael Irving
    Although it makes up everything we see and touch on a daily basis, ordinary (or baryonic) matter is relatively rare in the universe, and weirder still there seems to be a huge chunk of it missing. After 20 years of scouring the sky, astronomers using the ESA's…
  • McDonald's looks to address plastic straw problem

    1:53am By Darren Quick
    Single-use plastic straws are a massive environmental problem. In the US alone, around 500 million straws are used every day, and according to a 2017 survey plastic straws are the 11th most commonly found trash in the ocean. The problem has recently started to…
  • New York "human tool" chews himself a stool

    1:35am By Loz Blain
    The slow food movement is all about appreciating the process of cooking, so perhaps we can call this the slow stool movement? This enthusiastic soul yanked down some lumber and gnawed it into shape with his teeth to see if he could build himself a seat without…
  • New trial confirms aerobic exercise does improve schizophrenia symptoms

    1:04am By Rich Haridy
    Exercise is good for you. This isn't news of course, but there is a growing body of research that is starting to suggest that exercise can improve a variety of cognitive deficits in conditions we traditionally wouldn't think physical activity could affect. A…
  • Light-sensing LCD motorcycle helmet visor self-tints in an instant

    12:46am By Loz Blain
    French company Shetters isn't satisfied with photochromic motorcycle visors that take a couple of minutes to go from clear to tinted, so it's striking out on a line of LCD-tinted visors that flick from clear to tinted in 0.08 seconds, running entirely on solar…
  • US$10,000 Stromer ST-5 sets new standards for the premium eBike experience

    12:29am By Loz Blain
    Swiss eBike company Stromer has gone all-out on its premium ST5, creating one of the most beautifully executed and feature-rich e-streetbikes on the market, with features from the motorcycle world to make it street-legal even in markets where it's too powerful…
  • Opportunity stays silent as Martian dust storm goes global

    12:00am By David Szondy
    Things are looking very unpleasant for NASA's Opportunity rover as the dust storm raging on Mars is officially classed as "global." Mission control has been out of contact with the unmanned explorer for over a week despite repeated attempts by NASA's Deep…
  • Follow-up study verifies accuracy of experimental autism blood test

    Wed 11:22pm By Rich Haridy
    Last year a team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute published an impressive study suggesting it had isolated a reliable set of biomarkers that could successfully, and objectively, diagnose Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in children. Now a…
  • Noise-masking Bose Sleepbuds now available to the restless public

    Wed 10:48pm By Michael Irving
    If you missed out on a pair of Bose's noise-masking Sleepbuds during the Indiegogo campaign last November, you can sleep easy knowing that the company has now made the device available to the rest of the public. The Bose Sleepbuds are designed to sit…
  • NASA releases US asteroid strike preparedness plan

    Wed 10:42pm By David Szondy
    The chances of a large asteroid striking the Earth are remote, but because the consequences of such an impact are potentially catastrophic, NASA takes the possibility very seriously. To help counter the most likely potential threat, called Near-Earth Objects…
  • Simple at-home smartphone test could detect early cognitive decline

    Wed 9:29pm By Rich Haridy
    The race is currently on to develop an effective and simple diagnostic tool to help identify patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI). A new study is suggesting that a simple at-home test, administered through a laptop or smartphone, could…
  • British Army wants to bridge the "last mile" with robots

    Wed 8:49pm By David Szondy
    The British Army goes robotic as it looks to autonomous vehicles to bridge the "last mile" in combat. On November 12, an Army Battlegroup from 1 Armed Infantry brigade will begin the four-week 2018 Autonomous Warrior Army Warfighting Experiment field exercise,…
  • Volvo begins new Made-in-USA era with S60 sedan

    Wed 7:48pm By C.C. Weiss
    Volvo has been among the leaders of slipping out of various major auto shows in favor of independent vehicle reveals, and this time it has a very good reason. The introduction of the all-new S60 coincides with the inauguration of Volvo's first-ever American…
  • Infrared-packin' drones used to hunt butterfly landmines

    Wed 5:43pm By Ben Coxworth
    While landmines in general are pretty awful, the PFM-1 "butterfly" mine is particularly nasty. Because of its small size and mainly plastic construction, the butterfly-shaped device is notoriously difficult to find using metal detectors or other common…
  • Nanolaser changes color, just like a chameleon

    Wed 4:13pm By Ben Coxworth
    Chameleons are able to change color via a layer of skin cells known as iridophores, which contain nanocrystals. As the lizards stretch or relax their skin, the spacing between those crystals changes, altering the manner in which they reflect light. Now,…
  • Ultra-flexible keyboard can be crumpled like paper

    Wed 1:52pm By Ben Coxworth
    While there are already portable keyboards that can be rolled up, we know how it is … sometimes you just want to crumple the thing up and jam it in your pocket. Well, new technology developed by South Korean scientists will allow you to do just that – plus…
  • Laser used for quicker and cheaper monitoring of molten steel

    Wed 1:02pm By Ben Coxworth
    Ordinarily, steel plants have to regularly halt production while a disposable probe gets lowered into the molten steel, measuring its temperature and collecting samples for chemical analysis. That may not be the case for much longer, though, thanks to a new…
  • Jammy ditches the slide, aims for snap-on portability

    Wed 12:08pm By Paul Ridden
    Last year, startup RnD64 launched a portable digital guitar called the Jammy that slid out from 12.6 inches long during transit to nearly 20 inches for play. It was certainly an odd-looking strum machine, but had real strings and stretched out to normal guitar…
  • Tiny chip brings micro-drones closer to reality

    Wed 12:08pm By James Holloway
    MIT's ongoing efforts to make flying drones ever smaller has passed a new milestone with the latest version of its Navion navigation chip. Essentially the brains for a drone the size of a honeybee, the chip measures just 20 square millimeters (0.03 sq in),…
  • London's Square Mile going greener from October

    Wed 10:04am By Paul Ridden
    The City of London Corporation has announced its intention to power the UK capital's financial district – which is home to the Stock Exchange and the Bank of England – using electricity sources only from renewables from October 2018...…
  • Canon's monstrous CMOS sensor goes meteor watching

    Wed 7:04am By Paul Ridden
    Canon first revealed its ultrahigh-sensitivity CMOS image sensor back in 2010, where its gargantuan proportions were given as 202 x 205 mm (7.95 x 8.07 in) – almost 40 times the size of a 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor. Now the veteran camera maker has…